Build a baseball team web site
Baseball Forums
Archive Forums
Baseball free tip of the week
Free baseball report
Baseball store
Baseball testimonials
Baseball instructions
Recommended baseball links




Baseball Discussion Group / Head Games / Afraid to Fail
login
join
search

moderated by bob_byrd  Reply to Discussion | New Discussion | Subscribe << previous || next >> 
Posted By Discussion Topic: Afraid to Fail

 subscribe to  this topic Printer-friendly Version  send this discussion to a friend  new posts last

nick898
11-22-2004 @ 5:16 PM                          
reply
profile
send p.m.
Member
Posts:
Joined: Apr 2004
          
I've realized that in many situations, I am afraid of failing. I'm afraid of the consequences of failing. What helps to stop worry about failing? What helps to stop being afraid of failing?

Go Red Sox!

Satchmaster
11-23-2004 @ 11:48 PM                          
reply
profile
send p.m.
Member
Posts:
Joined: Nov 2004
          
Understand the importance of failure as a learning process. Then dwell on the feeling of success. Think more about how you will PREPARE yourself. Get task conscious. Failure is in the FUTURE. Get in the PRESENT. What will make you better right now?? NOW is all there is. Future is an uncontrollable.

THop
11-26-2004 @ 11:08 AM                          
reply
profile
send p.m.
Member
Posts:
Joined: Sep 2001
          
nick898

Great thread and advice from satchmaster.

One of the reasons I like to teach so many individual skills is because it guarantees, not only that every player on my team will improve every year, but it also guarantees they will have to fail A LOT in the beginning (less later). This way, my players learn real quick that he who learns the most advanced skills, improves the most and gets to play the game the longest. In great attempts it is glorious even to fail-Vince Lombardi.

I was always taught that humility comes before honor and today, make extra sure that I pass that on to every player.

Physical mistakes are a very good thing on my teams. My outfielders are taught to NEVER pull up on a blooper or line drive and my pitchers love them for this reason. We get a lot of great hitters out this way. And when they do dive/slide and miss that line drive that costs us a ball game, they know I am always there for them.

The same applies to hitting, base running and pitching. The best coaches provide parameters and stick to them, in my opinion. When this happens, players play fearlessly. They never hold anything back and always “want the ball” in pressure situations. And when everyone gets on this page, the team reaches it’s potential and often over achieves.

I can’t tell you how many of my teams have beaten better teams. I mean true David and Goliath type stories.

When every player wants to get more chances to “come through in the clutch” it’s a lot more fun. Team chemistry reaches an uncommon level and individuals begin to respect everyone but fear no one.

I can’t tell you how many youth and high school players I see make a physical mistake during a game and look at the coach (or parent) in less than a second.

I can’t tell you how many of my BEST players resisted learning more advanced skills because it made them look bad the first day. Many of their EROC parents said I was trying to hold them back when the exact opposite was true.

I can’t tell you how many of my BEST players seemed content to just ride their pre-puberty, early growth spurt/size and strength advantage all the way to Cooperstown NY I guess.

I can’t tell you how many “little league heroes” I see playing in the infield in high school who won’t even attempt a back hand with cross over step or do or die play during pre game infield, much less in a game. Not to mention fore hand and backhand picks on short hops, sliding, hitting the middle out strike hard the other way, going from 1st to 3rd on a blooper between the infield and outfield, etc. etc. etc. etc. etc. etc. etc. etc.

I can’t tell you how many of my BEST players have poor mouthed teammates for making physical mistakes along the way up. Not saying that you were one of these but, if you were, then this could be a part of your problem.

Baseball is a hard game to play well. If it were easy, everyone would be great at it. I’d certainly be in the Hall of Fame today.

My advice is to take a step back and review your past and then what you want out of the game. It’s all about what you can do for your team, not the other way around. If you are more concerned about being replaced for making a mistake, than showing off your skills, then baseball might not be for you.

Push your limits. Challenge yourself to master what you are already good at and seek to emulate the advanced skills you see professional players perform on TV. Respect everyone but fear nothing or no one. Don’t just be a “Bo Sox Fan”, STAY OUT OF YOUR COMFORT ZONE now so you can “cowboy up” later.

We can all learn from a lot from the “idiots” who risked failure to break the curse of the Bambino.

Hope this helps,

THop

This message was edited by THop on 11-26-04 @ 11:17 AM

virg
12-23-2004 @ 2:00 PM                          
reply
profile
send p.m.
Member
Posts:
Joined: Dec 2003
          
nick,
A chance to fail is a chance to succeed.

Am I wrong or what? The flip sides: succeed/fail, excited/dead, win/lose, try/die. The choices are easy, and you know why you play. Admit it to yourself and welcome a chance to fail, because a chance at that is a shot at Succeeding and you never get enough of them. Stay hungry and get ready!






  

virg

This message was edited by virg on 12-23-04 @ 5:52 PM

Jim-Ski
12-29-2004 @ 3:39 PM                          
reply
profile
send p.m.
Member
Posts:
Joined: Mar 2003
          
THop

I am preparing to coach T-ball this spring.  What attitudes as you discussed would be essential to instill at this level?  Any examples of how I may do this?

I too am like nick898.  I also see the point Satchmaster is making.  Since I began reading Head Games (up to Chapt. 3) I am finding these concepts so foriegn almost to the point of resisting them.  What must I do to turn the corner and head in the right direction.  I not only want to change my ways but I also want to instill this into my young boys so they are not writing a note like this when they are 41.

Happy New Year everyone!

Jim-ski

Memphis
06-13-2005 @ 12:55 AM                          
reply
profile
send p.m.
Member
Posts:
Joined: Dec 2001
          
Here's an attitudinal approach I have always tried to encourage with my players.

http://www.learningfountain.com/gutsfail.htm

Sometimes you have to do unusual things ... out of the norm ... in order to succeed. The "standard way" will not always work. The key is knowing when those situations arise. You have to recognize when the situation requires an instant and extraordinary effort and, further, be willing to take the risk ... even if it results in a little embarrassment. It's the willingness to try that defines greatness.

And all truly great athletes (not just baseball players) ... have that willingness to try. And when they fail, they walk off the field with their held high even though there may be those who are critical.

One of my favorite quotes is from Michael Jordan:

"I've missed over 9000 shots in my career. I've lost almost 300 games. 26 times, I've been trusted to take the game winning shot and missed. I've failed over and over and over again in my life. And that is why I succeed."

David Emerling
Memphis, TN

This message was edited by Memphis on 6-13-05 @ 10:12 AM

Jim-Ski
06-15-2005 @ 2:57 PM                          
reply
profile
send p.m.
Member
Posts:
Joined: Mar 2003
          
Much water has flowed under the bridge since I last wrote and I have grown up a lot.  I found a quote from Curt Schilling posted on my wall at work, that really shook me up,
"I don't have a problem with that kind of expectation (being in a pressure situation).  You know me.  That doesn't bother me, because I don't see a lot of people stepping up on the biggest days of their life.  People get too scared.  They don't take the step.  They don't even want to be in that situation.  I want to every day because I'm going to walk away from that day, win or lose, and know something more about myself."

I didn't want to be cowering on the biggest days of my life.  I have made some stands and I am a better man because of it!

Jim-ski



Baseball Discussion Group Home | Back to Baseball Excellence

Copyright © 2021 - Baseball-excellence.com